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TV Reviews

Review: The Dragon Prince Season 3

*This is my spoiler-y review of The Dragon Prince season three*

I recently devoured season three of Netflix’s The Dragon Prince. I really like this show, but I often feel that I should really dislike this show. My main complaint is that plot events often feel very far-reached to me, e.g., Viren will do something just so ridiculously bad or things move to fast. Overall, though, this show has so much fantasy goodness that the end of each season has left me eagerly anticipating the next.

Book Three: Sun, takes off right where Book Two left off. Interestingly, there was no summary of the first two seasons, leaving my wife and I frantically searching the internet for a few things. We do get a brief scene of a nameless, very Viren-like (???) mage blinding the dragon Sol Regem, whom Rayla and Callum must face as they seek to enter Xadia.

Speaking of that ‘ship–it happens! Many fans rejoiced at the Rayllum (Call-la?) developments, my wife included, but I’m still holding on to a very small hope for Claudi-um (Call-lia?) because I’m sick. Anyway, Rayla, Callum, and Zym make it past Sol Regem and are crushed to learn that Rayla is basically dead to her people and that they have the magic to back up that sentiment. Thankfully Runaan’s husband briefly breaks himself out of the cruse and helps the crew along their journey to the Dragon Queen. They finally arrive after making it through the super-creepy desert with Nyx, who will hopefully not be a one-off.

Meanwhile, Ezran discovers that he just can wait to be king, handing control of the kingdom back over to Viren as he realizes he can’t convince Prince Dudebro to give peace a chance. Ezran’s friends and our favorites conspire to free him from the dungeon and send him off to find Rayllum in Xadia.

Viren descends into “no, this is totally fine” levels of relationship with Aaravos and drags Claudia and like eighty percent of the human population down with him. Disturbingly but all too realistically, Viren is able to lure the masses into his evil plot by playing to their fears, insecurities, and xenophobia (Xadia-phobia, get it?).

Our heroes make their stand along with the remnants of the Sun Elves at the base of the Dragon Queen’s mountain, but they eventually win–yay!

One of the most satisfying elements of season three was the completion of Soren’s redemption arc, which is encapsulated in his facial hair growth. After hitting rock bottom in the last season, Soren has to accept that his dad is absolutely the worst and wouldn’t know true love or empathy if it was standing right in front of him. Soren’s arc was important to the show for more than just its emotional pay off. For a show that can feel so touch-and-go with lots off one-off characters and seemingly-superfluous magics, it was good to have three-season arc like Soren’s.

Note Soren’s redemption beard

One of the most satisfying elements of season three was the completion of Soren’s redemption arc, which is encapsulated in his facial hair growth. After hitting rock bottom in the last season, Soren has to accept that his dad is absolutely the worst and wouldn’t know true love or empathy if it was standing right in front of him. Soren’s arc was important to the show for more than just its emotional pay off. For a show that can feel so touch-and-go with lots off one-off characters and seemingly-superfluous magics, it was good to have three-season arc like Soren’s.

Though there are still questions remaining* this season was the first to have an ending with resolution. It has that nice halfway point feel.

*Like, “wtf, Viren?”

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